Health & Biotechnology

Optimal Nutrition: Are Fats Killers or Saviors?

USDA Food Pyramid, traditional, lots of carbs

Health, wealth, wisdom, work, love and freedom.
Those are the keys to the kingdom of happiness.

But, health always comes first. As the saying goes — without it, you've got nothing. Now, here are the keys to good health — nutrition, sleep, exercise, freedom from infections and toxins, and freedom from pain and stress.

Nutrition is a difficult piece to get right, but it's well worth the effort.

You're a community of ten trillion cells each in equilibrium with what you eat. So, what's the optimal recipe?

Let's say you eat 2400 calories a day, and let's say 400 calories are protein. How many of the remaining 2000 calories should come from carbs and (hence) how many should come from fats.

This issue has vexed medical researchers for decades. Here, I examine this in detail and show you some of the best free articles and videos on nutrition.

Automated Medical Discovery: the RX Project

A computer, tirelessly combing through patient records, looking for new medical knowledge. That was my Stanford PhD thesis project almost 40 years ago — an early example of data mining and machine learning under AI control.

RX garnered many awards and contracts and was presented worldwide by myself and my co-PI and thesis advisor, Stanford CSD Professor (now Emeritus), Gio Wiederhold.

Imagine how hard it was to do in the late 1970s in the era of mag tape and crawling CPUs.

Nobody else (was foolish enough to try or) tried to do this in the seventies. Now, in the current era of big data, everybody's trying to do it.

Coronary Artery CT Scans

If famed newscaster Tim Russert had had a coronary CT Scan, he might still be alive.

Here, I argue in favor of getting scanned. (If you've got calcified arteries, they show up like Christmas tree lights.)

This is a story with a highly personal angle. (I've got coronary calcifications, and if you're a man my age you do, too.)

Ladies — your biology gives you a ten year reprieve.

Carmat: Artificial Heart

Carmat Heart

This was a stunning breakthrough — a permanent (goal is 5 years) artificial heart.

I closely followed this story from French biotech Carmat. They were tight-lipped since their first patient died in early 2014 after surviving only 75 days. Their second patient, a 68 year old man, went home in January 2015 and had been pedaling his stationary bike like mad. He died in May, 2015 having lived a normal life for 9 months. Their third patient was implanted in April 2015 and survived to November, 2015.

This story was widely covered and (miscovered.) Some writers commented that "it'll be too expensive — at an estimated cost of $200,000."

No! 200K is rounding error compared to OR and ICU charges for many terminal heart patients. Besides, the value of a human life is > $5 million — about $100,000 a year (per the statisticians.)

"It's too large for women." That's because it's only version 1.0.

Also note that women's heart disease starts on average ten years after men's. Go visit residents in a senior facility (an "old folks home.") The vast majority are women — most of the men died from heart attacks years before.

Bridge to transplant — for many patients awaiting a donor heart, the Syncardia artificial heart has been the best solution. It's been implanted in 1400 patients enabling many to go home.

Another of my favorite cardio-companies is Heartware, maker of LVADs. Check out their Longhorn pump (preclinical.) It spins at 21,000 rpm and kicks out 7 liters per minute.

Also see these inspiring stories from Thoratec from recipients of their HeartMate II LVAD and also read about Thoratec's HeartMateIII, now in trials.

Here's former Vice President Dick Cheney arrestingly chatting about his heart transplant.

Calorie Restriction Slows Aging in Monkeys

calorie restricted monkey

This was a "stop-the-presses" story that broke in July, 2009. A 20 year study found that Rhesus monkeys fed a nutritious, low-calorie diet had far less heart disease, cancer, and diabetes than controls that ate 30% more. Monkeys on the diet out-survived the controls by 50% and had much less cerebral atrophy. Lose weight now — if you want to look more like the sleek fellow on your left.

Transcend: Live Forever

Transcend is a 2009 work by Ray Kurzweil and Terry Grossman.

I had avidly read their previous health book, Fantastic Voyage and benefited by its recommendations.

This is my review, as posted on Amazon. The book rated a B+.

(My review got over a thousand upvotes — pretty good — but not as good as Bruno Mars, doing Uptown Funk, at 1.6 billion!)

My personal favorite longevity recommention is dancing.
Don't miss Dick Van Dyke, now 90!

Transcend Drugs!

After finishing Ray's and Terry's book above, I wondered which (if any) of their recommended vitamins and supplements I should take. I researched them all.

At that time I had access to the Natural Standard — an encyclopedic reference written by a group of university clinicians. Here, I posted my findings.

My general rule is — get your nutrition from food. Skip the supplements!

I do take a few of those recommended in the book (eg, vitamin D.)

Does Drug X Really Work?

Want a one-word answer? "No!"

(The snake oil merchants are always ahead of the scientists.)

This was a long overdue essay on evaluating medical evidence.

Every new vitamin or supplement is greeted by unbridled enthusiasm.

I spent a decade studying biostatistics. The default hypothesis is that drug X does not work. This essay shows you what it takes to show it does.
(It takes years of effort!)

Sean's Accident

The saga of my son Sean's broken arm.

The photos are not for the faint-hearted.

Synthetic Coronary Artery Bypass Grafts

Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is the major killer in the United States.

If the artery was a plugged kitchen drain pipe, you'd simply buy a replacement. So, why aren't replacement (synthetic) coronaries available?

This is a brief overview of one company's struggle to develop a synthetic graft. (2012 Note: That company, known as Cardiotech in 2009, discontinued this development.)

There's been plenty of R & D since then — that's a reminder to me to update this.

The Inner Life of a Cell

This brief, incredible animation was done for Harvard by BioVisions. Their director, David Bolinksy, tells the story in a longer version presented at TED.

I have several articles on my website dealing with atherosclerosis — the main killer in the developed world. This video shows exactly how it happens in great biomolecular detail.

Similarly, biology animator Drew Berry shows us the incredible nanotech involved during cell division when DNA replicates and is pulled apart by microtubules. Magic!

Whole Genome for a Hundred Dollars

One of the show-stoppers of the 2010 Foresight Nanotech Conference was the above video showing Pacific Biosciences' SMRT tech, which sequences DNA bases in real-time (msecs) as DNA polymerase incorporates each base.